Attracting and Retaining Talent Conference

Date: 
30 June 2017
Time: 
09:15 for 10:00 -14:00
Venue: 
Devonport Lecture Theatre Plymouth University Drake Circus Plymouth PL4 8AA
Summary: 

Attracting and retaining talent is critical for boosting business productivity and growth.

In 2016, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills found that there were over 70,000 job openings in the South West region and around 17,000 of them difficult to fill because of a lack of skilled recruits. The number of job vacancies going unfilled is reported to be linked to candidates lacking appropriate skills, and the FSB (2015) found that this is the third biggest barrier to growth.

Devon and Cornwall Business Council, working collaboratively with Gradsouthwest and other businesses across the region, are therefore developing a campaign to promote the South West as an excellent place to build a career, with the aim of attracting and retaining highly skilled people.

With unfilled vacancies and untapped potential, business growth and our continued prosperity will require employers to retain and upgrade the skills they already have and to attract more highly skilled people to work within the region.

Aligned with the South West Growth Charter’s commitment to “invest in productive people and retain talent within our region”, our first job is to develop a strong and inclusive partnership of employers, educators and regional champions.

At this conference you will hear from businesses and training providers from across the region, outlining the opportunities and challenges they face with attracting and retaining talent in the South West. Our key note speaker is Charlie Ball, Head of Higher Education Intelligence at Prospects who will give an overview of talent migration from a national perspective

Delivery Organisation: 
Devon and Cornwall Business Council
How to Register: 

By invitation only

For more information - please contact events@dcbc.co.uk

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